The Rosary, a Weapon for These Times!

The rosary is the weapon for these times.”

These words spoken by Saint Padre Pio ring true in every age.  The Rosary is a powerful weapon in our times just as it was in his.  The simplicity and repetitiveness of the Rosary do not take away the power it contains.

When Our Lady of Fatima appeared to the three shepherd children on May 13, 1917, her message was clear, “Pray the Rosary every day in order to obtain peace for the world.”  Her message reaches into our times as well, and serves as a valuable reminder.

The Rosary begins with the Apostles’ Creed, followed by an Our Father, three Hail Marys (offered for an increase in Faith, Hope, and Charity), and a Glory Be.

The Mysteries of the Rosary

There are four mysteries in the Rosary: the Joyful, Sorrowful, Luminous, and Glorious Mysteries.  Through praying the Rosary, we contemplate the mysteries and events in the lives of Jesus and Mary and unite ourselves more closely to them.

The Joyful Mysteries are usually prayed on Mondays, Wednesdays, and during Advent – on Sundays.  The Annunciation, The Visitation, The Nativity, The Presentation, and the Finding of Jesus in the Temple.

The Sorrowful Mysteries are usually prayed on Tuesdays, Fridays, and during Lent – Sundays.  The Agony in the Garden, The Scourging at the Pillar, the Crowning with Thorns, The Carrying of the Cross, and the Crucifixion and Death of Our Lord.

The Glorious Mysteries are usually prayed on Wednesdays and Sundays (except during Lent or Advent).  The Resurrection, The Ascension, The Decent of the Holy Spirit, The Assumption of Mary, and The Coronation of Mary as Queen of Heaven and Earth.

The Luminous Mysteries were instituted in 2002 by Pope Saint John Paul II and are usually prayed on Thursdays.  The Baptism of Jesus, The Wedding Feast at Cana, Jesus’ Proclamation of the Kingdom of God, The Transfiguration, and The Institution of the Eucharist.

After praying the five decades, say the Hail, Holy Queen, and end with the following:

Leader: Pray for us, O holy Mother of God.
Response: That we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ.
Let us pray: O God, whose Only Begotten Son,
by his life, Death, and Resurrection,
has purchased for us the rewards of eternal life,
grant, we beseech thee,
that while meditating on these mysteries
of the most holy Rosary of the Blessed Virgin Mary,
we may imitate what they contain
and obtain what they promise,
through the same Christ our Lord. Amen.

We’ve got special short stories and coloring sheets too!

Our Lady of Fatima             Saint Francisco              Saint Jacinta

Plus we have some beautiful articles to share about the Rosary!!

A short history of the rosary

Draw close to Our Lady

The Family that prays together stays together

 

The Family that Prays Together, Stays Together

The Family That Prays Together, Stays Together

Praying the Rosary as a family is a highly encouraged practice.  When children are young, there is a prayer parents can pray for their children after each decade: With this Rosary I bind my children to the Immaculate Heart of Mary for her guidance and protection.

Children can learn to pray the Rosary at an early age, due to the simplicity and repetition of the prayers.  They can begin by simple listening then move to responding, and eventually to leading one of the decades.  The process can take time, but will eventually prove fruitful.  One can only imagine what the power of the Rosary and children’s prayers can accomplish.  They may not understand what they are saying at first, but understanding will come with time.  Reading small passages from a children’s Bible and explaining the significance of the Rosary and the meaning and power of the prayers, may help children understand the true power and value of the Rosary.

In my family, the Rosary has become an integral part of every day.  When I was little, my parents used to let me play while they prayed the Rosary together.  Eventually, they decided if I could talk, I could pray.  I would sit and listen, join in when I could, and when I was school-age, I began leading.  My siblings eventually joined the ranks as well.  As babies, they would hold jumbo-rosaries and suck on the large plastic beads.  After years of listening, with mastery came the responsibility of leading a decade.  Each of us leads a decade.  We usually pray before or after dinner and it is a quiet time to calm down from business of the day.

“If at First You Don’t Succeed – Try, Try Again.”

There were (and still are) many failed attempts and many distractions to overcome.  The advice from Thomas Palmer’s famous poem has been put into practice numerous times – “if at first you don’t succeed….”  Praying the Rosary takes patience and perseverance, even after years of routine.  With time, however, children come around to expecting the Rosary as part of the daily routine.  There are days some of us fall asleep or are busy calculating how much time will be left to play or study afterwards, or are busy making faces at whoever is in front of us, but over the years I have become grateful for this prayer time.  It brings us together for half-an-hour to calm down and thank God for His goodness.

It is a respite from the craziness of the day.  There are many days I wish I had half-an-hour extra of study-time and my mind is elsewhere.  There are somedays we arrive at the end and I wonder what I just said.  However, one thing I have come to realize, is that the Rosary is a source of great comfort.  When the world seems to be falling apart, the Rosary is a source of consistency and unity, “an ever present help in distress” (Psalm 46:1).

We’ve got special short stories and coloring sheets to celebrate today!

Our Lady of Fatima             Saint Francisco              Saint Jacinta

Plus we have some beautiful articles to share about the Rosary!!

A short history of the rosary

Draw close to Our Lady

The Rosary a weapon for our times!

 

Our Lady of the Rosary: Our Refuge and Hope

The Month of the Rosary

October is a busy month.  Fall is making its presence known, school is in full swing, and Halloween is fast approaching.  However, in the Catholic calendar, October is the month of the Rosary.  More specifically, October 7 is the feast of Our Lady of the Rosary.

However – what do October and Our Lady of the Rosary have to do with each other and how did the Rosary originate?

Origins of the Rosary

The history of the Rosary mostly consists of legend and tradition.  There is evidence that beads were used to count Our Fathers and Hail Marys in the Middle Ages.  Fittingly, bead is derived from the Old English word for prayer.

Between the twelfth and fifteenth centuries, the structure of the Rosary included praying fifty Hail Marys together with the Psalms.  Our word Rosary derives its meaning from the word rosarium, or rose garden.  Saint Louis de Montfort wrote in his book, The Secret of the Rosary,

The word Rosary means “Crown of Roses,” that is to say that ever time people say the Rosary devoutly they place a crown of…roses upon the heads of Jesus and Mary. Being heavenly flowers these roses will never fade or lose their exquisite beauty.

“One day, through the Rosary…Our Lady will save the world.”

Saint Dominic’s words have proven themselves true countless times.  The Rosary has been a sign of hope and a source of many graces.  There is a tradition that in 1214, Our Lady appeared to Saint Dominic and gave him the Rosary as we know it today.  She offered it as a way to convert hardened sinners.

During his lifetime, Saint Dominic fought the Albigensian heresy.  After the vision of Our Lady, he encouraged the praying of the Rosary especially in his work among the Albigensians.  When Saint Dominic died in 1221, the Albigensian heresy was no longer a major threat.

Our Lady of the Rosary: A Feast of Victory

The sixteenth century was a dangerous time in Europe as the Ottoman Empire was expanding throughout Europe.  In 1571, Pope Pius V created an alliance between several Christian nations to form the Holy League, whose purpose was to defend Christian civilization from the Turks.  Don John of Austria headed the Holy League’s fleet.

Pope Leo XIII said, “It has always been the habit of Catholics in danger and in troublous times to fly for refuge to Mary,” and this was no exception.  Sailing under a blue flag bearing the image of Christ crucified, the fleet’s crew members fasted and prayed the Rosary for protection.  Pope Pius V urged Christians all throughout Europe to do the same.

The famous naval Battle of Lepanto took place on October 7, 1571.  The result was a decisive victory for the Holy League.  Around 7,500 people died on the Christian side during the battle, while the Turks lost around 30,000 people, making this battle the first major defeat of a Turkish fleet.

The Feast of Our Lady of the Rosary

Pope Pius V credited the victory at Lepanto to Our Lady of the Rosary – Our Lady of Victory.  In thanksgiving for her intercession, he declared October 7 to be the feast of Our Lady of the Rosary in 1573.  Pope Clement XI then declared it a feast for the universal Church in 1716.

The rosary is the weapon for these times.”

These words spoken by Saint Padre Pio ring true in every age.  The Rosary is a powerful weapon in our times just as it was in his.  The simplicity and repetitiveness of the Rosary do not take away the power it contains.

When Our Lady of Fatima appeared to the three shepherd children on May 13, 1917, her message was clear, “Pray the Rosary every day in order to obtain peace for the world.”  Her message reaches into our times as well, and serves as a valuable reminder.

The Rosary begins with the Apostles’ Creed, followed by an Our Father, three Hail Marys (offered for an increase in Faith, Hope, and Charity), and a Glory Be.

The Mysteries of the Rosary

There are four mysteries in the Rosary: the Joyful, Sorrowful, Luminous, and Glorious Mysteries.  Through praying the Rosary, we contemplate the mysteries and events in the lives of Jesus and Mary and unite ourselves more closely to them.

The Joyful Mysteries are usually prayed on Mondays, Wednesdays, and during Advent – on Sundays.  The Annunciation, The Visitation, The Nativity, The Presentation, and the Finding of Jesus in the Temple.

The Sorrowful Mysteries are usually prayed on Tuesdays, Fridays, and during Lent – Sundays.  The Agony in the Garden, The Scourging at the Pillar, the Crowning with Thorns, The Carrying of the Cross, and the Crucifixion and Death of Our Lord.

The Glorious Mysteries are usually prayed on Wednesdays and Sundays (except during Lent or Advent).  The Resurrection, The Ascension, The Decent of the Holy Spirit, The Assumption of Mary, and The Coronation of Mary as Queen of Heaven and Earth.

The Luminous Mysteries were instituted in 2002 by Pope Saint John Paul II and are usually prayed on Thursdays.  The Baptism of Jesus, The Wedding Feast at Cana, Jesus’ Proclamation of the Kingdom of God, The Transfiguration, and The Institution of the Eucharist.

After praying the five decades, say the Hail, Holy Queen, and end with the following:

Leader: Pray for us, O holy Mother of God.
Response: That we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ.
Let us pray: O God, whose Only Begotten Son,
by his life, Death, and Resurrection,
has purchased for us the rewards of eternal life,
grant, we beseech thee,
that while meditating on these mysteries
of the most holy Rosary of the Blessed Virgin Mary,
we may imitate what they contain
and obtain what they promise,
through the same Christ our Lord. Amen.

The Family that Prays Together, Stays Together

Praying the Rosary as a family is a highly encouraged practice.  When children are young, there is a prayer parents can pray for their children after each decade: With this Rosary I bind my children to the Immaculate Heart of Mary for her guidance and protection.

Children can learn to pray the Rosary at an early age, due to the simplicity and repetition of the prayers.  They can begin by simple listening then move to responding, and eventually to leading one of the decades.  The process can take time, but will eventually prove fruitful.  One can only imagine what the power of the Rosary and children’s prayers can accomplish.  They may not understand what they are saying at first, but understanding will come with time.  Reading small passages from a children’s Bible and explaining the significance of the Rosary and the meaning and power of the prayers, may help children understand the true power and value of the Rosary.

In my family, the Rosary has become an integral part of every day.  When I was little, my parents used to let me play while they prayed the Rosary together.  Eventually, they decided if I could talk, I could pray.  I would sit and listen, join in when I could, and when I was school-age, I began leading.  My siblings eventually joined the ranks as well.  As babies, they would hold jumbo-rosaries and suck on the large plastic beads.  After years of listening, with mastery came the responsibility of leading a decade.  Each of us leads a decade.  We usually pray before or after dinner and it is a quiet time to calm down from business of the day.

There is a Blessed Mother Magnet and she is also included in the Saint Stickers Multipack.

“If at First You Don’t Succeed – Try, Try Again.”

There were (and still are) many failed attempts and many distractions to overcome.  The advice from Thomas Palmer’s famous poem has been put into practice numerous times – “if at first you don’t succeed….”  Praying the Rosary takes patience and perseverance, even after years of routine.  With time, however, children come around to expecting the Rosary as part of the daily routine.  There are days some of us fall asleep or are busy calculating how much time will be left to play or study afterwards, or are busy making faces at whoever is in front of us, but over the years I have become grateful for this prayer time.  It brings us together for half-an-hour to calm down and thank God for His goodness.

It is a respite from the craziness of the day.  There are many days I wish I had half-an-hour extra of study-time and my mind is elsewhere.  There are some days we arrive at the end and I wonder what I just said.  However, one thing I have come to realize, is that the Rosary is a source of great comfort.  When the world seems to be falling apart, the Rosary is a source of consistency and unity, “an ever present help in distress” (Psalm 46:1).

A Feast for All Time

The month of October is a powerful time to draw close to Our Blessed Mother by praying the Rosary.  She loves it when we draw near to her in trust.  Praying the Rosary is similar to small children reaching up to hold the hand of their mother in complete trust.

During her lifetime, Mother Teresa always carried a rosary in her hand.  In this way, she said, she was holding Mary’s hand.

Saint Louis de Montfort said, “Mary is the safest, easiest, shortest, and most perfect way of approaching Jesus.”  May she draw us ever nearer to her Immaculate Heart and to that of her beloved Son.

Our Lady of the Rosary, Our Lady of Victory – Pray for us!

Sacrifice Beads: Small Acts of Love

Sacrifice Beads: A Little Way to Heaven

Sacrifice Beads are a simple and easy way help children learn to offer up their smallest deeds for love of God.  Saint Therese saw every little deed of hers as a staircase by which she could “climb” to Heaven – one small step at a time.  God accepts even the smallest things we do, because the greatness of our actions is nothing if we do not have love.

By counting their good deeds, children may learn to be more conscientious about their actions and intentions.  Placing ten beads on the Sacrifice Beads allows them to double as one-decade rosaries also.

Teaching children to make Sacrifice Beads is simple, easy, and may help to draw them in.  They may be more eager to use something they helped make themselves, versus something that was made for them.

Sacrifice Beads and Saint Therese

When Saint Therese was a little girl, she used Sacrifice Beads to count her acts of love for God.  Every little deed of love and sacrifice is seen and loved by God, no matter how small they are.

Materials

-23 inch piece of Nylon jewelry cord

-10 pony/large plastic beads

-A tea light candle

-Medal of Saint Therese

-Small crucifix

-Matches

-Scissors

Step One

+Burn both ends of the cord to avoid fraying.  Hold the end of the cord close to the flame for a few seconds and then tap the area gently and quickly until you have a firm needle.

Step Two

+Thread the medal of Saint Therese onto the center of the cord.

Step Three

+Thread one end of the cord through the first bead and then thread the other end through the opposite side of the same bead.

+Make sure to keep the bead centered by holding the ends of the cord together while pushing the bead down towards the medal.

Step Four

+Repeat step three until all ten beads are in place.

Step Five

+Thread both ends of the cord through the ring of the crucifix.  Pull it towards the beads, leaving a distance of about an inch between the beads and the crucifix.

Step Six

+Take the ends of the cord and fold them under and to the right of the crucifix.

+Thread both ends of the cord through the loop that is created.

+Hold the crucifix in place and pull carefully but tightly, creating a firm knot.  The crucifix may sit a little crooked at first, but will straighten out with time.

Step Seven

+ Cut the cord close to the knot, leaving a distance of about a few millimeters to allow for burning.

Step Eight

+Hold the cord close to the flame until the ends start melting.  Press down gently but firmly until the ends start melting.  Press down gently but firmly on the melted ends to seal and prevent fraying.

Step Nine

+Ask a priest to bless your Sacrifice Beads and then you can start to use them!  Remember to offer up all your actions for love of God.

Ask God and Saint Therese to help you along the little way to holiness.

You can read more about Saint Therese of Lisieux here. We also have a special short story for little children about her as well as a magnet and a free coloring page.  There is also a sticker of Saint Therese included in the Saint Stickers Multipack.

Saint Therese, please pray for us!

Saint Therese of Lisieux: God’s Little Flower

Saint Therese of Lisieux: The Early Years

Saint Therese of Lisieux was born Marie Francois Therese Martin on January 2, 1873 in Alencon, France.  She was the youngest of nine children, but only five girls survived into adulthood: Marie, Pauline, Leonie, Celine, and Therese.  Her parents are Saints Louis and Zelie Martin.

Therese was spoiled, proud, sensitive, attention-seeking, and stubborn.  One day, Leonie had a box of dress-making materials for dolls that she offered to Celine and Therese.  Celine chose one ball of wool, but Therese took the whole box and said, “I choose all!”  Eventually, she would learn to choose all not for her own sake but for love of God.

Zelie Martin died of breast cancer in 1877 bringing tragedy into the previously happy family.  Four-year-old Therese adopted Pauline as her mother for the next six years.

In 1883, Pauline entered the Carmelite monastery in Lisieux.  Shortly afterwards, Therese contracted a mysterious illness.  She was miraculously cured by a smile from a statue of Our Lady of Victories.  Shortly after Therese’s cure, Marie also entered the Carmelite monastery.

Little Therese had wished to become a nun since the age of three, and now, at the age of ten she begged to join the Carmelite monastery following in the footsteps of her two older sisters.  However, the local bishop suggested she wait until she was older.

The Christmas Miracle

When Therese was thirteen she had what she calls her “Christmas conversion.”  She says in her autobiography Story of a Soul, “In an instant I grew up.”  It was at this moment that she stopped being self-centered and became determined to save the souls of great sinners.  This Christmas miracle increased her desire to become a Carmelite nun and gave her back the joy she lost when her mother died ten years earlier.  For the rest of her life she would be remembered for the joy she radiated.

A Hidden Life

At the age of fourteen, Therese sought permission to enter the Carmelite monastery in Lisieux as soon as possible.  He asked her why she wished to enter when she was so young.  She replied, “I wished it since the dawn of reason.”  After the local bishop refused, she traveled to Rome with her father and Celine and appealed to Pope Leo XIII for permission to enter.  He told her, “do what the superiors tell you.”  Therese tried again saying “Oh, Holy Father, if you say yes, everybody will agree!”  She wrote in Story of a Soul, “He gazed at me speaking these words and stressing each syllable: “Go – go – you will enter if God wills it.”  The tearful Therese had to be carried out by Swill Guards but this did not stop her determination.

On New Year’s Day 1888, permission was finally granted.  On April 9, 1888, at the age of fifteen, Therese entered the Carmelite monastery in Lisieux – the desert of her dreams.

Therese received the habit at the age of sixteen, and made her religious profession at the age of seventeen, on September 8th, 1890, the birthday of the Blessed Mother.  She took the religious name Sister Therese of the Child Jesus and of the Holy Face.  During her time as a sister, she was known as an ordinary, good, reliable, and talented nun.  She served as sacristan and mistress of novices, painted pictures, and wrote poems and short plays.

The Little Way

Therese is most known for her “Little Way.”  She spoke not of doing great things, but of small things with great love.  She saw herself as a child who lived in complete dependence on God.  Therese acknowledged her littleness and believed this showed more clearly God’s greatness.  She once said, “If all the lowly flowers wished to be roses, nature would lose its springtime beauty.”  Therese saw herself as a tiny flower in the garden of God and believed His power shone more clearly through her weakness.  She had a practice that helped her count her little deeds for God that is simple and perfect for children of all ages.

Therese had a string of beads, now known as Sacrifice Beads – or good deed beads.  This is a simple string of beads with a medal on one end and a crucifix on the other.  In between are ten beads.  Children love carrying these in their pockets and often become very conscientious as they seek to make Jesus happy.  Every time they make a sacrifice or do a good deed or say a kind word, they can pull a bead towards the cross.  However, it is important for them to understand that Saint Therese considered even picking up a small piece of string to be an act of love.  It is not the greatness of what we do that matters, but the love with which we do them.

If you would like to learn how to make and use Sacrifice Beads, this tutorial will help you.  They are very child-friendly to make and use.  Also, to help introduce Saint Therese of Lisieux to children, a magnet and a coloring page of Saint Therese are available.  There is also a sticker of Saint Therese included in the Saint Stickers Multipack.

Leaving a Legacy

When Pauline became the prioress, Marie told her that Therese was “an angel who would not stay long on this earth.”  Pauline then asked Therese to write what would become the first part of her autobiography – Manuscript A.  In 1896, Therese requested to become a missionary and was about to leave for Vietnam when she contracted tuberculosis.  She only told Pauline of her sickness in 1897.  After Pauline’s term as prioress ended, the new prioress asked Therese to write about her convent life which became Manuscript B.  Therese later added another section – Manuscript C and dedicated it to her sister, Marie.

Going Home

Therese grew gradually weaker and weaker from the tuberculosis.  The last few months of her life were shrouded in complete spiritual darkness in which she felt completely separated from God.  However, the same perseverance that characterized her whole life stayed with her even in her final days.  Surrounded by her blood sisters and the sisters in Carmel, Sr. Therese died on September 30, 1987 when she was only twenty-four years old.  She gazed at her crucifix and said, “My God…I love you.”

Pope Pius XI canonized Saint Therese of Lisieux on May 17, 1925.  If she was still alive she would have been only fifty-two years old.

After Therese’s death, Pauline edited manuscripts A, B, and C to create The Story of a Soul – the autobiography of St. Therese of Lisieux.  On World Mission Sunday on October 19, 1997, Pope St. John Paul II proclaimed Saint Therese of Lisieux a Doctor of the Universal Church.  In his own words, “Therese of the Child Jesus and the Holy Face is the youngest of all the “Doctors of the Church”, but her ardent spiritual journey shows such maturity, and the insights of faith expressed in her writings are so vast and profound that they deserve a place among the great spiritual masters.”  She was the only Doctor of his pontificate.

A Family of Saints

Of all the Martin sisters, four entered the Carmelite monastery in Lisieux.  Pauline, Marie, and Therese were the first.  Celine entered in 1984 after the death of Louis Martin.  Marie Guerin, one of the Martin’s cousins also entered the same monastery.  Leonie was the only sister to not become a Carmelite.  She entered the Visitation monastery in Caen after Therese died, and took the name Sr. Francois Therese, in memory of her sister.  Leonie was the first follower of St. Thérèse and the first to put into practice Thérèse’s “Little Way.”  She is now a Servant of God.  In addition, Pope Francis canonized Louis and Zelie Martin on October 18, 2015.

“Believe that I shall be your true little sister for all eternity.”

Saint Therese of Lisieux has many names such as the little flower, the saint of the little way, and the greatest saint of modern times.  Her message of simplicity and childlike trust in God, our merciful father is timeless and lives on in many hearts as a spirit of courage and hope.  In 1927, Pope Pius XI declared her the universal co-patron of the missions with St. Francis Xavier.  Her love for the missions and her power of intercession were so strong that she was a missionary in spirit even though she never physically left the monastery in Lisieux.  In 1994, Pope St. John Paul II named her co-patroness of France with St. Joan of Arc.

 Saint Therese is also the patroness of florists.  She loved flowers and mentioned them often.  “When I die, I will send forth a shower of roses from the heavens.”  Throughout the years, she has proven faithful to her promise of intercession and will never forget those she loves.

“I will spend my heaven doing good upon earth.”

Saint Therese’s feast day is October 1, but her message reaches all people at all times.  God wants to meet us wherever we are and He is accessible to all who seek Him.  The little way is a way of forgiveness, confidence, trust, and love.  It is selfless and simple.  St. Therese of Lisieux is a great saint who arrived at holiness by a simple path we all can follow.  She is with us and will help us.

A simple prayer to Saint Therese of Lisieux is:

O Saint Therese the little flower please pick me a rose from the heavenly garden and send it to me as a message of love.  O Little Flower of Jesus, ask God to grant the favors I now place with confidence in your hands (Mention specific requests).  Saint Therese, help me to always believe as you did in God’s great love for me, so that I might imitate your “Little Way” each day.  Amen.

Saint Therese wants us to love God with the same simple trust with which she loved him.

St. Therese of Lisieux – Pray for us!

Crash Course on the Archangels

The Feast of the Archangels – Our Heavenly Friends

September 29 is the Feast of the Archangels.  This is a special day on which we remember three angels who are powerful with God.  What distinguishes an archangel from an angel?  In Heaven, there are nine choirs of angels and the archangels are members of the second-last choir.  Their name means “above the angels.”  We know the names of three of the archangels – Michael, Gabriel, and Raphael.

Each archangel has a name with a special meaning.  Saint Michael’s name means, “Who is like God?”  He is the leader of all angels in God’s heavenly army.  Saint Gabriel’s name means “Strength of God.”  He appeared to Zachariah to foretell the birth of John the Baptist.  However, the most important message he ever delivered was to Mary to announce that she was going to be the Mother of Jesus.  The strength of God shines through the messages Saint Gabriel delivers.  Saint Raphael’s name means “God heals.”  He appears in the Book of Tobit, disguised as a human.  He travels with Tobiah as his guide, heals Tobit (Tobiah’s father) of his blindness, delivers Sarah from an evil spirit, and brings Tobiah and Sarah together.

On the Feast of the Archangels, we should say a special prayer that they will be with us and protect us.  The archangels, just like the saints, want to be our special friends in high places.  We should turn to them in our every need on any day and at any time.

Turning to the Archangels

Saint Michael will help us fight fear and temptations.  We should pray to him for protection against the attacks of the evil enemy and when we feel weak or powerless.  He is also the patron saint of police and soldiers.  We should pray to him for the safety and protection of those who strive to keep us safe.  There are many special prayers to Saint Michael.  The one written by Pope Leo XIII is very popular:

Saint Michael the Archangel, defend us in battle.  Be our defense against the wickedness and snares of the Devil.  May God rebuke him, we humbly pray, and do thou, O Prince of the heavenly hosts, by the power of God, thrust into hell Satan, and all the evil spirits who prowl about the world seeking the ruin of souls.  Amen.

Another prayer to Saint Michael is less common, but just as powerful.  There is a powerful story about a Marine who was saved by Saint Michael in 1950.  In the story he mentions this short prayer that is very easy to say and remember:

Michael, Michael of the Morning, fresh chord of Heaven adorning, keep me safe throughout this day and in temptation drive the devil away.  Amen.

Saint Raphael is the patron saint of the blind, nurses, physicians, happy meetings, and of those waiting for their future spouse.  We may only think to pray to Saint Christopher when we travel, but Saint Raphael is the patron saint of travelers as well.  Saint Gabriel is the patron saint of media, messengers, and postal workers.  We can think of him whenever we pray the Angelus.  When we say, The Angel of the Lord declared unto Mary… we are talking about Saint Gabriel.

To help introduce children to these powerful angels we’ve created a Saint Michael coloring sheet and magnet.  There is a Saint Gabriel magnet and coloring sheet also!  There are also stickers of Saint Michael and Saint Gabriel included in the Saint Stickers Multipack.

Powerful Intercessors Throughout the Year

We should pray to the archangels whenever possible, but especially on September 29, the Feast of the Archangels.  They are very powerful intercessors!  No need is too small or too large for them to handle.  They will bring our petitions before the throne of God and help us, just as they have helped countless others before.

Saints Michael, Gabriel, and Raphael – Pray for us and lead us to Heaven!

Monique Sammut is a senior at Franciscan University of Steubenville interning with My Catholic Kids for the fall semester.  She is majoring in English Writing with an associates degree in Child Development.  She lives in Steubenville with her family and loves to read, write short stories, and make rosaries.